Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

News

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

12.11.13

                                    

A heat exchanger created by Hieta using the 3D printing process. A heat exchanger is a piece of equipment built for efficient heat transfer from one medium to another and is often found in engines. 

Two Bristol companies have joined forces with international technology company Renishaw to break new ground in 3D printing – the process of building objects layer on layer rather than cutting, drilling and bolting pieces together.

While 3D printing has been around for some years and has the potential to completely reshape product development, it isn’t yet repeatable on a large scale, meaning it cannot be used to mass-produce objects.

Additive manufacturing company Hieta and software developer Sysemia are now working with Renishaw, the UK’s only manufacturer of a metal-based 3D printing machine, to find ways of scaling up the process.

Funding has been provided by the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board – an organisation set up by Government to stimulate and support business-led innovation. The project’s aim is to produce 50,000 recuperators per year, a device that recovers waste heat in engines, within a three to five year period.

The project started from a partnership that began at the Bristol & Bath Science Park, where Hieta and Sysemia are based. 

Mike Adams, chief executive officer at Hieta Technologies, said: “One of the biggest challenges our industry faces is how to commercialise 3D printed products. We expect this project to completely redefine the boundaries of additive manufacturing and prove that a large number of the same object can be produced at a competitive cost.

“We moved to the Science Park because we wanted to be somewhere which nurtured new ideas and gave us the opportunity to work with like-minded organisations.

“That’s exactly what the Park has delivered and within a few months of being here we had struck up a relationship with Sysemia and we quickly realised that we could work together to develop this project with Renishaw.

“We are a young and vibrant company and we want to attract the best people, so Bristol is a good fit for us. It means we can tap into the high proportion of graduates and post-graduates in the city.”

Hieta Technologies was founded two years ago and started with a virtual office at the Park before moving to a bigger six-person office in October. It plans to move to a bigger office in the New Year.

Bonnie Dean, chief executive of the Bristol & Bath Science Park, said: “Hieta is a great example of how ground breaking projects can be born out of serendipitous meetings at the Science Park.

“Our purpose is to create a vibrant eco-systemwhere entrepreneurs and businesses can find unexpected opportunities.”

Hieta started out producing heat exchangers for engines using the additive manufacturing process but has now diversified and produces a wide range of engineering products for a number of industries including automotive, aerospace and general manufacturing.

Mike Adams continued: “One of the great advantages of 3D printing is that it’s less wasteful than traditional manufacturing techniques because you don’t need to cut or remove materials in order to create an object. It also has the potential to create lighter and more efficient products.

“The possibilities are endless. Imagine a situation where the whole world can take part in this process, with 3D printing being done at home, in the office, at hospitals and in schools. This could open the doors to all sorts of every day products being ‘printed’ by anyone who has access to the technology.”

More news.

+44 (0)117 370 7700 info@bbsp.co.uk

News

  • 01.02.17
  • CFMS to participate in High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult Sit-Ski Project
  • Bristol, 1st February 2017 - The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) today announced it will be participating in the Sit-Ski Project, led by the High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult. Working with two Great Britain (GB) Paralympic downhill skiers, this exciting new project will showcase the best of British technology through a redesign of a customised sit-ski appliance, used by para-alpine skiers.

  • Read more.
  • 08.11.16
  • UK solar car racing team signs CFMS as sponsor, gets access to Cray supercomputer for car design modelling
  • Aerodynamics modelled using computational fluid dynamics - cuts testing from days to minutes

    The UK based solar racing team, Solar Team Great Britain, that is aiming to be the first British team to win the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, has today announced it has signed the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, as a strategic sponsor.
  • Read more.
  • 07.11.16
  • Minister for Industry and Energy visits Bristol and Bath Science Park
  • Jesse Norman, Minister for Industry and Energy visited Bristol and Bath Science Park (BBSP), meeting with the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, and HiETA Technologies, experts in Additive Manufacturing (AM).
  • Read more.

Event

  • 28.02.17
  • CFMS Big Breakfast
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), will be hosting its annual ‘The Big Breakfast Event’ on 28th February 2017, 8-10.30am. Held at Bristol and Bath Science Park, CFMS is inviting customers, members, partners, neighbouring tenants and businesses from Bristol and the surrounding area to join them for breakfast.
  • Read more.
  • 21.03.17
  • Introducing EPIC and HPC in the Cloud
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) and Zenotech will be holding a breakfast briefing on the topic of High Performance Computing (HPC) in the Cloud as part of its facilitated breakfast series.
  • Read more.
  • 09.05.17
  • South Glos Expo
  • The Inaugural South Glos Expo will give sole traders, microbusinesses and SMEs based in South Gloucestershire and those wishing to become known in the area the opportunity to showcase their products and services.
  • Read more.
Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

News

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

12.11.13

                                    

A heat exchanger created by Hieta using the 3D printing process. A heat exchanger is a piece of equipment built for efficient heat transfer from one medium to another and is often found in engines. 

Two Bristol companies have joined forces with international technology company Renishaw to break new ground in 3D printing – the process of building objects layer on layer rather than cutting, drilling and bolting pieces together.

While 3D printing has been around for some years and has the potential to completely reshape product development, it isn’t yet repeatable on a large scale, meaning it cannot be used to mass-produce objects.

Additive manufacturing company Hieta and software developer Sysemia are now working with Renishaw, the UK’s only manufacturer of a metal-based 3D printing machine, to find ways of scaling up the process.

Funding has been provided by the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board – an organisation set up by Government to stimulate and support business-led innovation. The project’s aim is to produce 50,000 recuperators per year, a device that recovers waste heat in engines, within a three to five year period.

The project started from a partnership that began at the Bristol & Bath Science Park, where Hieta and Sysemia are based. 

Mike Adams, chief executive officer at Hieta Technologies, said: “One of the biggest challenges our industry faces is how to commercialise 3D printed products. We expect this project to completely redefine the boundaries of additive manufacturing and prove that a large number of the same object can be produced at a competitive cost.

“We moved to the Science Park because we wanted to be somewhere which nurtured new ideas and gave us the opportunity to work with like-minded organisations.

“That’s exactly what the Park has delivered and within a few months of being here we had struck up a relationship with Sysemia and we quickly realised that we could work together to develop this project with Renishaw.

“We are a young and vibrant company and we want to attract the best people, so Bristol is a good fit for us. It means we can tap into the high proportion of graduates and post-graduates in the city.”

Hieta Technologies was founded two years ago and started with a virtual office at the Park before moving to a bigger six-person office in October. It plans to move to a bigger office in the New Year.

Bonnie Dean, chief executive of the Bristol & Bath Science Park, said: “Hieta is a great example of how ground breaking projects can be born out of serendipitous meetings at the Science Park.

“Our purpose is to create a vibrant eco-systemwhere entrepreneurs and businesses can find unexpected opportunities.”

Hieta started out producing heat exchangers for engines using the additive manufacturing process but has now diversified and produces a wide range of engineering products for a number of industries including automotive, aerospace and general manufacturing.

Mike Adams continued: “One of the great advantages of 3D printing is that it’s less wasteful than traditional manufacturing techniques because you don’t need to cut or remove materials in order to create an object. It also has the potential to create lighter and more efficient products.

“The possibilities are endless. Imagine a situation where the whole world can take part in this process, with 3D printing being done at home, in the office, at hospitals and in schools. This could open the doors to all sorts of every day products being ‘printed’ by anyone who has access to the technology.”

More news.

Event

  • 28.02.17
  • CFMS Big Breakfast
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), will be hosting its annual ‘The Big Breakfast Event’ on 28th February 2017, 8-10.30am. Held at Bristol and Bath Science Park, CFMS is inviting customers, members, partners, neighbouring tenants and businesses from Bristol and the surrounding area to join them for breakfast.
  • Read more.
  • 21.03.17
  • Introducing EPIC and HPC in the Cloud
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) and Zenotech will be holding a breakfast briefing on the topic of High Performance Computing (HPC) in the Cloud as part of its facilitated breakfast series.
  • Read more.
  • 09.05.17
  • South Glos Expo
  • The Inaugural South Glos Expo will give sole traders, microbusinesses and SMEs based in South Gloucestershire and those wishing to become known in the area the opportunity to showcase their products and services.
  • Read more.

News

  • 01.02.17
  • CFMS to participate in High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult Sit-Ski Project
  • Bristol, 1st February 2017 - The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) today announced it will be participating in the Sit-Ski Project, led by the High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult. Working with two Great Britain (GB) Paralympic downhill skiers, this exciting new project will showcase the best of British technology through a redesign of a customised sit-ski appliance, used by para-alpine skiers.

  • Read more.
  • 08.11.16
  • UK solar car racing team signs CFMS as sponsor, gets access to Cray supercomputer for car design modelling
  • Aerodynamics modelled using computational fluid dynamics - cuts testing from days to minutes

    The UK based solar racing team, Solar Team Great Britain, that is aiming to be the first British team to win the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, has today announced it has signed the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, as a strategic sponsor.
  • Read more.
  • 07.11.16
  • Minister for Industry and Energy visits Bristol and Bath Science Park
  • Jesse Norman, Minister for Industry and Energy visited Bristol and Bath Science Park (BBSP), meeting with the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, and HiETA Technologies, experts in Additive Manufacturing (AM).
  • Read more.

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

+44 (0)117 370 7700

info@bbsp.co.uk

Event

  • 28.02.17
  • CFMS Big Breakfast
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), will be hosting its annual ‘The Big Breakfast Event’ on 28th February 2017, 8-10.30am. Held at Bristol and Bath Science Park, CFMS is inviting customers, members, partners, neighbouring tenants and businesses from Bristol and the surrounding area to join them for breakfast.
  • Read more.
  • 21.03.17
  • Introducing EPIC and HPC in the Cloud
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) and Zenotech will be holding a breakfast briefing on the topic of High Performance Computing (HPC) in the Cloud as part of its facilitated breakfast series.
  • Read more.
  • 09.05.17
  • South Glos Expo
  • The Inaugural South Glos Expo will give sole traders, microbusinesses and SMEs based in South Gloucestershire and those wishing to become known in the area the opportunity to showcase their products and services.
  • Read more.

News

  • 01.02.17
  • CFMS to participate in High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult Sit-Ski Project
  • Bristol, 1st February 2017 - The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) today announced it will be participating in the Sit-Ski Project, led by the High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult. Working with two Great Britain (GB) Paralympic downhill skiers, this exciting new project will showcase the best of British technology through a redesign of a customised sit-ski appliance, used by para-alpine skiers.

  • Read more.
  • 08.11.16
  • UK solar car racing team signs CFMS as sponsor, gets access to Cray supercomputer for car design modelling
  • Aerodynamics modelled using computational fluid dynamics - cuts testing from days to minutes

    The UK based solar racing team, Solar Team Great Britain, that is aiming to be the first British team to win the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, has today announced it has signed the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, as a strategic sponsor.
  • Read more.
  • 07.11.16
  • Minister for Industry and Energy visits Bristol and Bath Science Park
  • Jesse Norman, Minister for Industry and Energy visited Bristol and Bath Science Park (BBSP), meeting with the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, and HiETA Technologies, experts in Additive Manufacturing (AM).
  • Read more.
Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

News

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

12.11.13

                                    

A heat exchanger created by Hieta using the 3D printing process. A heat exchanger is a piece of equipment built for efficient heat transfer from one medium to another and is often found in engines. 

Two Bristol companies have joined forces with international technology company Renishaw to break new ground in 3D printing – the process of building objects layer on layer rather than cutting, drilling and bolting pieces together.

While 3D printing has been around for some years and has the potential to completely reshape product development, it isn’t yet repeatable on a large scale, meaning it cannot be used to mass-produce objects.

Additive manufacturing company Hieta and software developer Sysemia are now working with Renishaw, the UK’s only manufacturer of a metal-based 3D printing machine, to find ways of scaling up the process.

Funding has been provided by the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board – an organisation set up by Government to stimulate and support business-led innovation. The project’s aim is to produce 50,000 recuperators per year, a device that recovers waste heat in engines, within a three to five year period.

The project started from a partnership that began at the Bristol & Bath Science Park, where Hieta and Sysemia are based. 

Mike Adams, chief executive officer at Hieta Technologies, said: “One of the biggest challenges our industry faces is how to commercialise 3D printed products. We expect this project to completely redefine the boundaries of additive manufacturing and prove that a large number of the same object can be produced at a competitive cost.

“We moved to the Science Park because we wanted to be somewhere which nurtured new ideas and gave us the opportunity to work with like-minded organisations.

“That’s exactly what the Park has delivered and within a few months of being here we had struck up a relationship with Sysemia and we quickly realised that we could work together to develop this project with Renishaw.

“We are a young and vibrant company and we want to attract the best people, so Bristol is a good fit for us. It means we can tap into the high proportion of graduates and post-graduates in the city.”

Hieta Technologies was founded two years ago and started with a virtual office at the Park before moving to a bigger six-person office in October. It plans to move to a bigger office in the New Year.

Bonnie Dean, chief executive of the Bristol & Bath Science Park, said: “Hieta is a great example of how ground breaking projects can be born out of serendipitous meetings at the Science Park.

“Our purpose is to create a vibrant eco-systemwhere entrepreneurs and businesses can find unexpected opportunities.”

Hieta started out producing heat exchangers for engines using the additive manufacturing process but has now diversified and produces a wide range of engineering products for a number of industries including automotive, aerospace and general manufacturing.

Mike Adams continued: “One of the great advantages of 3D printing is that it’s less wasteful than traditional manufacturing techniques because you don’t need to cut or remove materials in order to create an object. It also has the potential to create lighter and more efficient products.

“The possibilities are endless. Imagine a situation where the whole world can take part in this process, with 3D printing being done at home, in the office, at hospitals and in schools. This could open the doors to all sorts of every day products being ‘printed’ by anyone who has access to the technology.”

More news.

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

News

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

12.11.13

                                    

A heat exchanger created by Hieta using the 3D printing process. A heat exchanger is a piece of equipment built for efficient heat transfer from one medium to another and is often found in engines. 

Two Bristol companies have joined forces with international technology company Renishaw to break new ground in 3D printing – the process of building objects layer on layer rather than cutting, drilling and bolting pieces together.

While 3D printing has been around for some years and has the potential to completely reshape product development, it isn’t yet repeatable on a large scale, meaning it cannot be used to mass-produce objects.

Additive manufacturing company Hieta and software developer Sysemia are now working with Renishaw, the UK’s only manufacturer of a metal-based 3D printing machine, to find ways of scaling up the process.

Funding has been provided by the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board – an organisation set up by Government to stimulate and support business-led innovation. The project’s aim is to produce 50,000 recuperators per year, a device that recovers waste heat in engines, within a three to five year period.

The project started from a partnership that began at the Bristol & Bath Science Park, where Hieta and Sysemia are based. 

Mike Adams, chief executive officer at Hieta Technologies, said: “One of the biggest challenges our industry faces is how to commercialise 3D printed products. We expect this project to completely redefine the boundaries of additive manufacturing and prove that a large number of the same object can be produced at a competitive cost.

“We moved to the Science Park because we wanted to be somewhere which nurtured new ideas and gave us the opportunity to work with like-minded organisations.

“That’s exactly what the Park has delivered and within a few months of being here we had struck up a relationship with Sysemia and we quickly realised that we could work together to develop this project with Renishaw.

“We are a young and vibrant company and we want to attract the best people, so Bristol is a good fit for us. It means we can tap into the high proportion of graduates and post-graduates in the city.”

Hieta Technologies was founded two years ago and started with a virtual office at the Park before moving to a bigger six-person office in October. It plans to move to a bigger office in the New Year.

Bonnie Dean, chief executive of the Bristol & Bath Science Park, said: “Hieta is a great example of how ground breaking projects can be born out of serendipitous meetings at the Science Park.

“Our purpose is to create a vibrant eco-systemwhere entrepreneurs and businesses can find unexpected opportunities.”

Hieta started out producing heat exchangers for engines using the additive manufacturing process but has now diversified and produces a wide range of engineering products for a number of industries including automotive, aerospace and general manufacturing.

Mike Adams continued: “One of the great advantages of 3D printing is that it’s less wasteful than traditional manufacturing techniques because you don’t need to cut or remove materials in order to create an object. It also has the potential to create lighter and more efficient products.

“The possibilities are endless. Imagine a situation where the whole world can take part in this process, with 3D printing being done at home, in the office, at hospitals and in schools. This could open the doors to all sorts of every day products being ‘printed’ by anyone who has access to the technology.”

More news.

Event

  • 28.02.17
  • CFMS Big Breakfast
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), will be hosting its annual ‘The Big Breakfast Event’ on 28th February 2017, 8-10.30am. Held at Bristol and Bath Science Park, CFMS is inviting customers, members, partners, neighbouring tenants and businesses from Bristol and the surrounding area to join them for breakfast.
  • Read more.
  • 21.03.17
  • Introducing EPIC and HPC in the Cloud
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) and Zenotech will be holding a breakfast briefing on the topic of High Performance Computing (HPC) in the Cloud as part of its facilitated breakfast series.
  • Read more.
  • 09.05.17
  • South Glos Expo
  • The Inaugural South Glos Expo will give sole traders, microbusinesses and SMEs based in South Gloucestershire and those wishing to become known in the area the opportunity to showcase their products and services.
  • Read more.

News

  • 01.02.17
  • CFMS to participate in High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult Sit-Ski Project
  • Bristol, 1st February 2017 - The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) today announced it will be participating in the Sit-Ski Project, led by the High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult. Working with two Great Britain (GB) Paralympic downhill skiers, this exciting new project will showcase the best of British technology through a redesign of a customised sit-ski appliance, used by para-alpine skiers.

  • Read more.
  • 08.11.16
  • UK solar car racing team signs CFMS as sponsor, gets access to Cray supercomputer for car design modelling
  • Aerodynamics modelled using computational fluid dynamics - cuts testing from days to minutes

    The UK based solar racing team, Solar Team Great Britain, that is aiming to be the first British team to win the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, has today announced it has signed the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, as a strategic sponsor.
  • Read more.
  • 07.11.16
  • Minister for Industry and Energy visits Bristol and Bath Science Park
  • Jesse Norman, Minister for Industry and Energy visited Bristol and Bath Science Park (BBSP), meeting with the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, and HiETA Technologies, experts in Additive Manufacturing (AM).
  • Read more.

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printingBristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

News

Bristol collaboration breaks new ground in 3D printing

12.11.13

                                    

A heat exchanger created by Hieta using the 3D printing process. A heat exchanger is a piece of equipment built for efficient heat transfer from one medium to another and is often found in engines. 

Two Bristol companies have joined forces with international technology company Renishaw to break new ground in 3D printing – the process of building objects layer on layer rather than cutting, drilling and bolting pieces together.

While 3D printing has been around for some years and has the potential to completely reshape product development, it isn’t yet repeatable on a large scale, meaning it cannot be used to mass-produce objects.

Additive manufacturing company Hieta and software developer Sysemia are now working with Renishaw, the UK’s only manufacturer of a metal-based 3D printing machine, to find ways of scaling up the process.

Funding has been provided by the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board – an organisation set up by Government to stimulate and support business-led innovation. The project’s aim is to produce 50,000 recuperators per year, a device that recovers waste heat in engines, within a three to five year period.

The project started from a partnership that began at the Bristol & Bath Science Park, where Hieta and Sysemia are based. 

Mike Adams, chief executive officer at Hieta Technologies, said: “One of the biggest challenges our industry faces is how to commercialise 3D printed products. We expect this project to completely redefine the boundaries of additive manufacturing and prove that a large number of the same object can be produced at a competitive cost.

“We moved to the Science Park because we wanted to be somewhere which nurtured new ideas and gave us the opportunity to work with like-minded organisations.

“That’s exactly what the Park has delivered and within a few months of being here we had struck up a relationship with Sysemia and we quickly realised that we could work together to develop this project with Renishaw.

“We are a young and vibrant company and we want to attract the best people, so Bristol is a good fit for us. It means we can tap into the high proportion of graduates and post-graduates in the city.”

Hieta Technologies was founded two years ago and started with a virtual office at the Park before moving to a bigger six-person office in October. It plans to move to a bigger office in the New Year.

Bonnie Dean, chief executive of the Bristol & Bath Science Park, said: “Hieta is a great example of how ground breaking projects can be born out of serendipitous meetings at the Science Park.

“Our purpose is to create a vibrant eco-systemwhere entrepreneurs and businesses can find unexpected opportunities.”

Hieta started out producing heat exchangers for engines using the additive manufacturing process but has now diversified and produces a wide range of engineering products for a number of industries including automotive, aerospace and general manufacturing.

Mike Adams continued: “One of the great advantages of 3D printing is that it’s less wasteful than traditional manufacturing techniques because you don’t need to cut or remove materials in order to create an object. It also has the potential to create lighter and more efficient products.

“The possibilities are endless. Imagine a situation where the whole world can take part in this process, with 3D printing being done at home, in the office, at hospitals and in schools. This could open the doors to all sorts of every day products being ‘printed’ by anyone who has access to the technology.”

More news.

Event

  • 28.02.17
  • CFMS Big Breakfast
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), will be hosting its annual ‘The Big Breakfast Event’ on 28th February 2017, 8-10.30am. Held at Bristol and Bath Science Park, CFMS is inviting customers, members, partners, neighbouring tenants and businesses from Bristol and the surrounding area to join them for breakfast.
  • Read more.
  • 21.03.17
  • Introducing EPIC and HPC in the Cloud
  • The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) and Zenotech will be holding a breakfast briefing on the topic of High Performance Computing (HPC) in the Cloud as part of its facilitated breakfast series.
  • Read more.
  • 09.05.17
  • South Glos Expo
  • The Inaugural South Glos Expo will give sole traders, microbusinesses and SMEs based in South Gloucestershire and those wishing to become known in the area the opportunity to showcase their products and services.
  • Read more.

News

  • 01.02.17
  • CFMS to participate in High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult Sit-Ski Project
  • Bristol, 1st February 2017 - The Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) today announced it will be participating in the Sit-Ski Project, led by the High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult. Working with two Great Britain (GB) Paralympic downhill skiers, this exciting new project will showcase the best of British technology through a redesign of a customised sit-ski appliance, used by para-alpine skiers.

  • Read more.
  • 08.11.16
  • UK solar car racing team signs CFMS as sponsor, gets access to Cray supercomputer for car design modelling
  • Aerodynamics modelled using computational fluid dynamics - cuts testing from days to minutes

    The UK based solar racing team, Solar Team Great Britain, that is aiming to be the first British team to win the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, has today announced it has signed the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, as a strategic sponsor.
  • Read more.
  • 07.11.16
  • Minister for Industry and Energy visits Bristol and Bath Science Park
  • Jesse Norman, Minister for Industry and Energy visited Bristol and Bath Science Park (BBSP), meeting with the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), a specialist in high value design capability, and HiETA Technologies, experts in Additive Manufacturing (AM).
  • Read more.